Blue Skies

What is it about a sunny day in winter that puts me in the mood to seed something? It’s a bone-chilling 13 degrees and I’m havin warm thoughts about setting tomato starts, building a weed-tree tee-pee, arbor, or trellis, mowin the yard or sharpenin the blades.

Power tools for a dull job

I’m sure most of you feel much the same when Old Man Winter decides to give us a peek of something we need so much more of at this time of year. Commonly known as seasonal affective disorder, I bet there’s at least a bazillion of us who suffer from it. The only thing that works to suppress it for me is natural, and most powerful, sunshine.

Attending gardening lectures and presentations when snow lies heavy helps shorten the time I have to wait for it to melt. Those of us who write about it are expecting another year of increased participation in growing edible gardens and speakers are “cashing in” on the need to provide beginners with useful info. It’s part of what we do to help supplement what little income trickles in from the words we write in papers, magazines, and books.

This writer is still waiting on a reply from a publisher who seems to be taking an inordinate amount of time to decide if my book proposal is worthy of further consideration.  I reckon it’s one of the hazards of the job, but the wait isn’t helpin my SAD.

I attended a lecture series at a local learning center over the weekend. Gardening was the topic and a lot of people showed up. I was invited to bring along some of my material for a reserved spot at one of the info tables. I gave a lecture at this locale last summer and had a wonderful time. While looking over a display of one of the presenters I noticed an organic gardening encyclopedia, an old one.

An old book about an old practice

Leafing through this old book I came across a couple of very interesting black and white photographs. The copyright date was 1959, with a first printing in March, a second in April, and third in August of the same year.

It was a thick book, and I’m sure there were more interesting photos, but I didn’t have time to look through all of it.

Old fashioned, but it's how I do it today

Let them eat . . . kudzu?

Be sure to click on the thumbnails for a larger view of these retro pictures, and notice the caption on the cows eating kudzu photo.

And finally, one more significant photograph that might say something about something…

I'm not really sure what condition its condition is in.

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10 Comments

  1. Now I see the cows! Here’s a corn-fed joke for you: A zookeeper spots a few stray cows grazing on a hillside and stops his car to watch. To his amazement, he sees a rare Lingualope trying to blend in with the small herd. He sneaks up on it from behind, attempts to throw a noose over its neck, and subsequently loses his balance when he hears this: “Not now! Can’t you see I’m trying to chew my cud, zoo-idiot?”

  2. Hi TC, I agree. We need more sun, it has been more shy than normal here too. At least the water table has been replenished. The old photos are fun, seeing someone wearing a suit in gardening type pursuits is always interesting. Are we supposed to measure from the lights? Goats are used here to cut the kudzu along highways with steep banks. They move the fences to where they want the stuff cut down, where it is too steep for men with mowers or bush hogs. As for politics, please everyone, wake up to the problems before us and work together.
    Just my two cents.
    Frances

    1. I don’t think it matters where you measure from Ms. Frances, just as long as you keep the lights within a couple inches of whatever it is you’re growin. And I’ve heard of kudzu-eating goats.

      “Wake up to the problems before us and work together.”
      Well said!

  3. Great pic of the terrific trio, don’t you think? Biden and Pelosi with their facial expressions… Makes you wonder what they’re really thinking. So where are all those cows that are s’posed to be eating the kudzu? TC, this post is anti-SAD.

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